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Jdk 1.4 Tutorial 2002 book

Jdk 1.4 Tutorial

Details Of The Book

Jdk 1.4 Tutorial

edition:  
Authors:   
serie:  
ISBN : 1930110669 
publisher:  
publish year: 2002 
pages: 408 
language: English 
ebook format : PDF (It will be converted to PDF, EPUB OR AZW3 if requested by the user) 
file size: 9 MB 

price : $10.08 14 With 28% OFF



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Abstract Of The Book



Table Of Contents

contents......Page 7
preface......Page 15
acknowledgments......Page 17
about this book......Page 19
author online......Page 27
about the cover illustration......Page 29
Basic NIO (New Input/Output)......Page 31
1.1 Doing I/O with channels and buffers......Page 32
1.1.1 Getting a channel from a stream......Page 33
1.1.3 Reading from a channel......Page 34
1.1.4 Writing to a channel......Page 35
1.1.5 Reading and writing together......Page 36
1.2.2 get() and put()......Page 37
1.2.3 Buffer state values......Page 39
1.2.4 flip() and clear()......Page 40
1.2.5 slice() and subbuffers......Page 42
1.2.6 Buffers of other types......Page 43
1.2.7 Reading and writing other types from a ByteBuffer......Page 44
1.2.8 Direct buffers......Page 46
1.2.9 Example: TCP/IP forwarding......Page 47
1.2.10 Doing I/O with channels and buffers......Page 57
1.3.1 Types of locks......Page 58
1.3.2 Using locks......Page 59
1.3.3 Acquiring locks......Page 60
1.3.4 Portability issues......Page 61
1.3.5 Example: a simple database......Page 62
1.4 Summary......Page 66
Advanced NIO (New Input/Output)......Page 67
2.1.1 Advantages of MappedByteBuffers......Page 68
2.1.3 Using MappedByteBuffers......Page 70
2.1.4 Example: checksumming......Page 71
2.2 Nonblocking I/O......Page 72
2.2.1 The multithreaded approach......Page 73
2.2.3 Polling......Page 74
2.2.4 Example: a polling chat server......Page 76
2.2.5 Multiplexing with select()......Page 79
2.3 Encoding and decoding with Charsets......Page 88
2.3.2 Finding available Charsets......Page 89
2.3.3 Using encoders and decoders......Page 91
2.4 Network interfaces......Page 93
2.4.3 Reporting on NetworkInterfaces......Page 94
2.4.5 Getting a NetworkInterface by InetAddress......Page 96
2.4.7 Listening on a particular address......Page 97
2.5 Summary......Page 103
Java2D......Page 105
3.1.1 Print Service packages......Page 106
3.1.3 Printer discovery......Page 107
3.1.4 Printer attributes......Page 109
3.1.5 The SimpleDoc class......Page 110
3.1.7 Example: printing an image......Page 111
3.1.8 Example: a custom print dialog box......Page 113
3.2 Reading and writing images with the Image I/O API......Page 118
3.2.2 Simple reading......Page 119
3.2.5 Discovering available formats......Page 120
3.2.7 Example: writing an image......Page 122
3.2.8 The ImageReader class......Page 123
3.2.9 The ImageWriter class......Page 125
3.2.10 Customizing the reading process......Page 127
3.2.11 Listeners......Page 129
3.2.12 Example: generating a graph......Page 132
3.3 Summary......Page 135
Java Web Start (JAWS)......Page 137
4.1 Understanding the JAWS execution model......Page 138
4.1.1 Client, server, and application......Page 139
4.1.3 Consider the possibilities......Page 140
4.2.2 The JNLP file......Page 141
4.3 Using the sandbox: services......Page 143
4.3.1 Using the sandbox: resources......Page 144
4.4 Bypassing the sandbox......Page 145
4.5 Example: a simple drawing program......Page 147
4.5.1 PicoDraw.java......Page 148
4.5.2 DrawCanvas.java......Page 161
4.5.3 TransferableImage.java......Page 165
4.6 Summary......Page 166
Logging......Page 167
5.1 Logging overview......Page 168
5.1.2 Logging levels......Page 169
5.1.3 Logger names and the logger hierarchy......Page 170
5.1.5 The LogRecord class......Page 171
5.1.6 Handlers......Page 172
5.1.8 Formatters......Page 173
5.1.10 The philosophy of logging......Page 174
5.2.1 Configuring handlers......Page 175
5.2.2 Configuration values for standard handlers......Page 176
5.2.3 Configuring loggers......Page 178
5.3 Using logging in a program......Page 179
5.4 Writing a custom handler......Page 185
5.5 Writing a custom formatter......Page 195
5.6 Summary......Page 198
Assertion facility......Page 201
6.1.1 Why use assertions?......Page 202
6.1.2 Assertions vs. other error code......Page 203
6.2 Working with assertions......Page 204
6.2.1 Assertion syntax......Page 205
6.2.2 Compiling with assertions......Page 207
6.2.3 Controlling assertions from the command line......Page 208
6.2.4 Controlling assertions programmatically......Page 211
6.2.5 Removing assertions completely......Page 212
6.2.6 Determining if assertions are enabled......Page 213
6.2.7 Catching an assertion failure......Page 214
6.2.8 Assertions and class initialization......Page 215
6.3.1 Avoiding inconsistent states......Page 217
6.3.3 Ensuring consistency between container objects and contained objects......Page 219
6.3.4 More complicated consistency checks......Page 222
6.4.1 Rules of use......Page 223
6.4.2 What to check for......Page 227
6.4.3 Miscellaneous rules......Page 232
6.5 Summary......Page 234
Exceptions......Page 235
7.1 Chained exceptions......Page 236
7.2.1 What is a stack trace?......Page 238
7.2.3 Writing a custom stack trace dumper......Page 240
7.2.4 Synthesizing a stack trace......Page 245
7.3 Summary......Page 258
Collections......Page 259
8.1.1 Rotating list elements......Page 260
8.1.3 Finding sublists within lists......Page 262
8.1.5 Converting enumerations to lists......Page 263
8.2.1 Using LinkedHashMap......Page 265
8.2.2 Using LinkedHashSet......Page 268
8.2.3 Efficiency of LinkedHashMap and LinkedHashSet......Page 270
8.2.4 Example: searching a file path......Page 271
8.3.1 Object equality......Page 276
8.3.3 Example: using the IdentityHashMap......Page 277
8.4 The RandomAccess interface......Page 282
8.5 Summary......Page 285
Regular Expressions......Page 287
9.1 Overview of regular expressions......Page 288
9.1.3 Quantifiers: * and +......Page 289
9.1.5 Character classes......Page 290
9.1.6 Predefined character classes......Page 291
9.1.8 Boundary matchers......Page 293
9.1.9 Reluctant (non-greedy) matching......Page 294
9.2 Pattern and Matcher......Page 295
9.2.1 Capturing groups......Page 297
9.2.2 Find and replace......Page 298
9.2.3 Flags......Page 299
9.3.1 Finding the longest word in a line......Page 300
9.3.2 Parsing a tab-delimited file......Page 303
9.3.3 A command-line processor......Page 306
9.3.4 Parsing and modifying names......Page 310
9.4 Example: HTML templating system......Page 315
9.5 Example: a lexical analyzer......Page 318
9.6 Summary......Page 326
The Preferences API......Page 327
10.1.1 Simple Preferences API example......Page 328
10.1.2 Appropriate applications of the Preferences API......Page 329
10.1.3 Design goals of the Preferences API......Page 331
10.2.1 Comparison with java.util.Properties......Page 334
10.3.2 Key/value pairs......Page 335
10.3.4 Definition of a user......Page 336
10.3.5 Pathnames......Page 337
10.4.1 Traversing the data hierarchy......Page 338
10.4.3 Allowable types......Page 341
10.4.5 Allowable values......Page 342
10.4.7 Default values......Page 343
10.4.10 Distinguishing between user and system nodes......Page 344
10.4.11 Node names and paths......Page 345
10.4.13 Determining the presence of nodes......Page 346
10.4.14 Removing nodes......Page 347
10.4.16 Syncing......Page 348
10.4.17 Example: storing GUI configuration......Page 349
10.5 Change listeners......Page 354
10.5.2 Node change listeners......Page 355
10.5.3 Example: listening for a GUI change request......Page 356
10.5.4 Example: changing server ports on the fly......Page 359
10.7 Importing and exporting......Page 365
10.8 Summary......Page 367
The Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE)......Page 369
11.1 Cryptographic terminology......Page 370
11.2.1 Components of the default implementation......Page 372
11.3 Managing keys......Page 373
11.3.3 Creating a KeyManagerFactory......Page 374
11.3.5 Creating an SSLContext......Page 375
11.4.1 The authentication model......Page 376
11.4.2 Generating the key......Page 377
11.4.3 The configuration file......Page 378
11.4.4 The code......Page 379
11.5.1 The authentication model......Page 389
11.5.2 Generating the keys......Page 390
11.5.3 The code......Page 392
11.6 Summary......Page 400
index......Page 401


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